When you get overpaid, you pay it back

When 10,000 Soldiers get overpaid while in the National Guard because the Pentagon and the NGB made a mistake.  Why should they have to pay it back.  We all remember during the height of the war how the bonuses were flowing to Active and Reserve Component Soldiers.  It appears in California, the largest of the National Guard organizations, has almost 10,000 Soldiers that have to pay back the bonuses they were paid.  To hold them accountable because retention NCOs and Officers didn’t cross their Ts and dot their Is seems horrible.  This is not just a problem for CalGuard, it’s problem for the NGB.  Some of the incentive program officials have been held accountable as stated in this LA Times article, but the DoD is placing a tremendous burden on Soldiers who served honorably and sacrificed a tremendous amount of their lives for the cause.  But as I recall once being overpaid, I saved that money because the next month DFAS took it back.

 

 

About slater

Is a young Cavalry Officer on the Frontier.
This entry was posted in Afghanistan, Army, Army National Guard, Army Reserve, Iraq, Leadership, Readiness, The Long War, Uncategorized, Veterans' Issues. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to When you get overpaid, you pay it back

  1. DaveO says:

    There were no T’s to dot or eyes to cross. The mission was to reenlist soldiers, period. They were paid up front. AND THEN the Army decided eligibility. The only 4 people who should pay back the money on behalf of ALL Guardsmen are the 2 Army G-1s and the 2 CSA. The G1 and CSA who created this mess, and the 2 that carried it out. The bonuses purchased warm bodies for combat. Contract is fulfilled. This is similar to buying a car. You get the car, the dealer gets the money and then you get 100% + interest and penalties of your money back. That our American Army, ever honorable.

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  2. Real Me 86 says:

    This is a despicable and diabolical thing to be happening now.

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  3. Tom Wilson '79 says:

    And how many of these people were wounded or killed? Do their families have to repay the money TEN YEARS after the bonuses were paid? Isn’t there a statute of limitation that applies. What standard BS on those of us who served, promised and paid then sorry. I understand the over payment on a check. Been there and had that done to me too in the Navy. Time for a leader to stand up and lead. Do not expect it, but it should occur.

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  4. burkemblog says:

    From today’s Atlantic:

    Defense Secretary Orders Suspension of Attempts to Recoup Bonuses From Veterans
    (Geert Vanden Wijngaert / AP)

    Defense Secretary Ash Carter ordered the Defense Department to stop collecting incentive bonuses from California National Guard soldiers “as soon as is practical.” Here’s the full statement:

    Audits completed in September found that nearly 10,000 California National Guardsmen weren’t eligible for the re-enlistment bonuses they received—$15,000 or more. The Pentagon said it wanted the money back, leaving about 2,000 veterans—who had fought in Iraq and Afghanistan—straddled with unexpected debts. The backlash resulted in lawmakers and others demanding that the Defense Department forgive the debt.

    The issue came to light last month when audits found that nearly 10,000 California National Guardsmen weren’t eligible for the re-enlistment bonuses they received. The Los Angeles Times reported last week that investigators found the bonuses were paid mostly between 2006 and 2008 after National Guard officials tried to meet enlistment goals during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Only soldiers with specific assignments were supposed to receive the money.

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  5. DaveO says:

    It is only a suspension of the action, and only for those who have not already paid in full or had other legal judgements taken against them. Too little, too late, and only because of the election in 12 days. What about the Guardsmen who aren’t in California, such as those in Red States?

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